Category Archives: Making Your Own Jigs

How to Make a Swim Jig

How to Make a Swim Jig

How to Make a Swim JigSpring time is a great time to learn how to make a swim jig. Then again, just about anytime is a good time to learn How to Make a Swim Jig!

Swim jigs are excellent fish catchers under a variety of conditions. They typically excel during times of the year when bass are shallow and active. So, spring, early summer and fall are usually the ideal times to use them.

But, today’s blog post is not about how to use a swim jig. It’s about how to make a swim jig! So let’s get to it!

The Trokar Weedless Pro Swim Jig is the swim jig that we will be talking specifically about today. It’s got a great head design and can be made with or without a fiber weed guard installed.

It also features recessed eye sockets that allow you to glue in whatever style eyes you want, to give your swim jig a completely custom look and feel for the lakes that you fish the most.

Dipping your new swim jigs in powder paint gives them a rock-hard finish that will stand up to just about anything you can subject them to. Rocks, weeds and timber won’t affect the paint, so you can fish your jigs confidently anywhere the bass live.

Once the paint has dried thoroughly, and you’ve glued the weed guards in place with epoxy, then it’s time to glue the eyes on. You can get some really nice 3D eyes here: 3D Lure Eyes.

Finally, once the eyes are in place, it’s time to give the jig that completely custom look with a skirt that’s tailored to the body of water where you’ll be using these nice new swim jigs to catch big bass.

Below is a great video that walks you through the entire process of making your own swim jigs, from start to finish.

If you’d rather not get involved in pouring lead, you can simply buy jig heads that are already poured and painted. All you’d need to do then is to create your own custom skirts. You can find some super nice pre-poured, pre-painted swim jigs by clicking here.

Items used for this project:

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If you’d like to learn how to wire tie a Jig skirt, click here.

And, as always, if you need any kind of lure-making supplies, be sure to visit our website, at http://lurepartsonline.com

How to Make A Brush Jig

How to Make a Brush Jig

How to Make a Brush JigAre you looking to learn how to make a brush jig? You’ve come to the right place!

Jigs have been used to catch big bass for decades. They’re a proven fish catcher and are fun to use once you learn their subtle nuances.

Brush jigs aren’t made to fish only in and around brush, despite their name. They can be used just about anywhere a bass will hide, including rocks, weeds, docks and more.

As with most other bass jigs, brush jigs can be dressed with a variety of materials. The most popular of those materials is rubber or silicone.

Some people choose to pour their own brush jigs, using melted lead and a mold, such as the  Do-It Molds BSH-3-SA Brush Jig mold. The SA model has 3 cavities and lets you pour jigs in 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 oz. sizes.

If you prefer heavier jigs, in the 5/8 oz. to 1 oz. sizes, you can use the BSH-3-SLA mold. This mold also has 3 cavities.

What You’ll Need

Before you get started, you’ll need to gather up some materials and parts to make your jigs with. You’ll need lead, fiber weed guards and hooks for the jig itself.

After the jigs are poured, you’ll need powder paint, rubber skirt material or silicone skirt material, and either skirt bands or wire to hold the skirts in place. We’ll include a list of these items and links to each of them at the bottom of the article 🙂

As always, be sure to do everything safely! Wear gloves to prevent burns to your hands. Or, at the very least, use latex or similar gloves to keep the lead residue off your hands. Some people also like to wear a mask to prevent breathing in anything toxic while pouring the lead. Again, some choose not to wear a mask, but to simply make sure they are in a well ventilated area, as mentioned in the video below.

The video below will walk you through the rest of the process, including some great tips for prepping the mold and keeping the operation flowing without any problems.

Items used for this project:

If you enjoyed this post, please be sure to like it and share it with your friends.

If you’d like to learn how to Tie a Silicone Finesse Jig, click here.

And, as always, if you need any kind of lure-making supplies, be sure to visit our website, at http://lurepartsonline.com

How to Tie a Silicone Finesse Jig

How to Tie a Silicone Finesse Jig

Learning how to tie a silicone finesse jig can be a bit tricky if you’re new to this method of tying. It’s not necessarily difficult to do. But there are a few little tips and tricks that can make it much easier to do, especially for the neophyte.

Our video below will show you all of the steps involved. And by the time you’re finished watching, you’ll know how to tie a silicone finesse jig with no problems at all. You may not be a pro, necessarily, but you’ll be well on your way to doing it easily.

Tying your own jigs will give you the benefit of being able to create them exactly the way you want them to look. So you ‘re not limited to the selection available from a retail store.

Finesse jigs excel for bass when the conditions are tough, especially after a cold front or when the water is extremely cold. The smaller profile will be more likely to get bit when bulkier lures get ignored. Keep this in mind when you’re fishing under tough conditions.

We have listed everything you need at the end of this post, but just to give you a heads up, you’ll be needing a fly tying vice, a small bass jig, some silicone skirt tabs and some fly tying thread.

Smalljaw, the creator of the tutorial video, goes into some good detail with what he likes to use for skirt material, thread and glue. And since he’s been at this for quite a while, we can take his advice as being solid, not just theory.

Choose Your Colors Carefully

How to Tie a Silicone FInesse JigTying the jig in the video requires only two colors, so you won’t need a huge selection of silicone skirt tabs. But choose your colors carefully. The idea with a finesses jig is usually to create something very natural looking.

But don’t be afraid to experiment a bit. Sometimes a specific lake will call for an odd color combination that most people wouldn’t even think of using. And if you can find that color combination, you will catch fish that most people will miss out on.

Check out the video tutorial below and then get yourself busy tying some custom silicone finesse jigs. The next time the bite gets tough, you’ll be glad you did!

Items used for this project:

If you enjoyed this post, please be sure to like it and share it with your friends.

If you’d like to learn how to make spinnerbaits for bass, click here.

And, as always, if you need any kind of lure-making supplies, be sure to visit our website, at http://lurepartsonline.com

How to Tie Your Own Bucktail Jigs

How to Tie Your Own Bucktail Jigs

How to Tie Your Own Bucktail JigsWhether you fish in freshwater or saltwater, knowing How to Tie Your Own Bucktail Jigs is an important skill to have.

Bucktail jigs are known for catching big striped bass in saltwater. But they can also catch some pretty big bass in freshwater too!

Many smallmouth bass anglers rely heavily on bucktail jigs to catch big smallmouths in the colder seasons. And although you don’t hear a lot about them being used for largemouth bass, there are a select handful of anglers who quietly use them to put big green fish in their boat regularly. They just don’t say much about it 😉

So, with all of that aside, why should you want to learn How to Tie Your Own Bucktail Jigs? Well, for starters they catch the heck out of the fish. They also look much different than most of the retail jigs you can buy at stores on online retailers. And learning how to tie your own bucktail jigs saves you a ton of cash. Nobody out there wants to spend more money than necessary on their fishing tackle!

You can choose to pour your own lead jigs. Or you can buy them already poured for you. Pouring them yourself saves you money, but it also involves your time and effort. So you will want to decide which works better for you.

Either way, once you have some good quality jigs in your hands, then you will need to get ready to start tying bucktail onto them. Learning to tie your own bucktail jigs isn’t extremely difficult, but it does take a bit of practice to get good at it.

We’ve taken all of the guess work out of it for you. We have included a video below that will walk you through the steps and have you tying your own bucktail jigs in no time at all. Just be patient and take your time.

And don’t expect to become an expert overnight. But give it some practice and you’ll soon be doing this like it’s nothing at all.

Have fun tying your own bucktail jigs. But most of all, have fun catching fish on them!

Items used for this project:

If you enjoyed this post, please be sure to like it and share it with your friends.

And, as always, if you need any kind of lure-making supplies, be sure to visit our website, at http://lurepartsonline.com